Thursday, February 14, 2013

Today in the Life of the Berlin Airlift

February 15, 1949

 

America's U.N. delegate, Philip Jessup, begins talks with his Soviet counterpart, Jacob Malik.

 

 

Kati Fabian - www.eaglesoverberlin.com

 

 

Road to Berlin Airlift

February 1946

 

The American foreign affairs adviser in post in Moscow, George Kennan, composes an 8,000-word "long telegram" laying out his understanding of the Soviet world view. Kennan's telegram helps shape U.S. foreign policy. George Kennan is best known as "the father of containment" and as a key figure in the emergence of the Cold War.

 

 

 

Kati Fabian - www.eaglesoverberlin.com

 

 

Road to Berlin Airlift

February 4 – 11, 1945.

 

President Franklin D. Roosevelt, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, and Soviet leader Joseph Stalin meet at Yalta and confirm a plan to divide both Germany and the city of Berlin into American, British, French, and Russian zones.

 

 

Kati Fabian - www.eaglesoverberlin.com

 

 

Today in the Life of the Berlin Airlift

January 31, 1949.

 

More than 170,000 tons of supplies have been airlifted this month, a new record. More than 20 airlift personnel have also died in January.

 

Kati Fabian - www.eaglesoverberlin.com

 

 

Today in the Life of the Berlin Airlift

January 24, 1949

 

The 250,000th ton of coal arrives at Tegel.

 

 

Kati Fabian - www.eaglesoverberlin.com

 

In the aftermath of the Berlin Airlift

January 18, 1951

 

Ernst Reuter is reelected mayor of West Berlin.

 

Kati Fabian - www.eaglesoverberlin.com/index.htm

 

 

Today in the Life od the Berlin Airlift

January 1949

 

The first American airlift participants begin rotating back to their home bases. The British begin evacuating Berlin children in planes that have unloaded their cargo.

 

Kati Fabian - www.eaglesoverberlin.com/index.htm

 

Friday, December 21, 2012

Today in the Life of the Berlin Airlift

December 31, 1948

100,000 flights have been completed since the airlift began.



Today in the Life of the Berlin Airlift

December 16, 1948

The new airport is ready, but two radio towers operated by the Soviets get in the way of landings.
French engineers destroy the transmitting towers for a communist-run radio station near Tegel.
The operation of the new airport began.



In the aftermath of the Berlin Airlift

December 11, 1957

Restriction on travel implemented :
Leaving East Germany without permission would result in a prison sentence of up to three years.



In the aftermath of the Berlin Airlift

December 22, 1989

Brandenburg Gate is opened in Berlin. The road is free between East and West Berlin.



Today in the Life od the Berlin Airlift

December 24, 1948

Bob Hope conducts a Christmas tour of airlift bases, performing for American soldiers in Berlin.



Today in the Life of the Berlin Airlift

December 20, 1948

"Operation Santa Claus" brings Christmas gifts to 10,000 Berlin children.




Road to Berlin Airlift

December 17, 1947

Congress enacts legislation authorizing the first aid payments of the Marshall Plan.




Thursday, November 29, 2012

Sunday, November 18, 2012

Today in the life of the Berlin Airlift ...


November 18, 1948

On this day, an RAF plane crashes into the Russian zone; four crew 
members die. The historical novel about the Berlin Airlift, “Eagles 
Over Berlin” commemorates all those who lost their lives during 
the first event of the Cold War Era.


Friday, November 9, 2012

What is the audience of Eagles Over Berlin?

12,6 percent of the American population (more than 35 millions) is over 65. Among them, there are 4.7 million veterans from the World War II. They lived this period in person and remember of the events and the amazement from their young years.
 
46 million Americans are from foreign origins; among them, 3.7 million Americans are foreign born German, British, French and Hungarian. The events related in the book concern them directly. By that alone, this book has an important international impact.
In the sixty years passed since the end of World War II, a new generation has grown up and for them, the sufferings of the war and its aftermath are only subjects of action movies.
Considering its historical and general aspects, this book is marketable to a wide audience including different generations with different motivation.